Bacterial colitis increases susceptibility to oral prion disease

Sigurdson, CJ; Heikenwalder, M; Manco, G; Barthel, M; Schwarz, P; Stecher, B; Krautler, NJ; Hardt, WD; Seifert, B; MacPherson, AJ; Corthesy, I; Aguzzi, A (2009). Bacterial colitis increases susceptibility to oral prion disease. Journal of infectious diseases, 199(2), pp. 243-52. Cary, N.C.: Oxford University Press 10.1086/595791

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Dietary exposure to prion-contaminated materials has caused kuru and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in cattle, mink, and felines. The epidemiology of dietary prion infections suggests that host genetic modifiers and possibly exogenous cofactors may play a decisive role in determining disease susceptibility. However, few cofactors influencing susceptibility to prion infection have been identified. In the present study, we investigated whether colitis might represent one such cofactor. We report that moderate colitis caused by an attenuated Salmonella strain more than doubles the susceptibility of mice to oral prion infection and modestly accelerates the development of disease after prion challenge. The prion protein was up-regulated in intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes of mice with colitis, providing a possible mechanism for the effect of colitis on the pathogenesis of prion disease. Therefore, moderate intestinal inflammation at the time of prion exposure may constitute one of the elusive risk factors underlying the development of TSE.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology

UniBE Contributor:

Macpherson, Andrew

ISSN:

0022-1899

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:05

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:20

Publisher DOI:

10.1086/595791

PubMed ID:

19072552

Web of Science ID:

000262086500013

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/28395 (FactScience: 120518)

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