The role of the human posterior parietal cortex in memory-guided saccade execution: a double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation study

Nyffeler, Thomas; Egli, Andreas; Pflugshaupt, Tobias; von Wartburg, Roman; Wurtz, Pascal; Mosimann, Urs; Hess, Christian W; Müri, René M (2005). The role of the human posterior parietal cortex in memory-guided saccade execution: a double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation study. European journal of neuroscience, 22(2), pp. 535-8. Oxford: Blackwell Science 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2005.04248.x

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The present study investigated the role of the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in the triggering of memory-guided saccades by means of double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS). Shortly before saccade onset, dTMS with different interstimulus intervals (ISI; 35, 50, 65 or 80 ms) was applied. For contralateral saccades, dTMS significantly decreased saccadic latency with an ISI of 80 ms and increased saccadic gain with an ISI of 65 and 80 ms. Together with the findings of a previous study during frontal eye field (FEF) stimulation the present results demonstrate similarities and differences between both regions in the execution of memory-guided saccades. Firstly, dTMS facilitates saccade triggering in both regions, but the timing is different. Secondly, dTMS over the PPC provokes a hypermetria of contralateral memory-guided saccades that was not observed during FEF stimulation. The results are discussed within the context of recent neurophysiological findings in monkeys.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Nyffeler, Thomas and Hess, Christian Walter

ISSN:

0953-816X

ISBN:

16045507

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:05

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:20

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1460-9568.2005.04248.x

PubMed ID:

16045507

Web of Science ID:

000230601300026

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/28430 (FactScience: 120727)

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