Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism

Slack, Emma; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Stecher, Bärbel; Velykoredko, Yuliya; Stoel, Maaike; Lawson, Melissa A E; Geuking, Markus B; Beutler, Bruce; Tedder, Thomas F; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F; McCoy, Kathy D; Macpherson, Andrew J (2009). Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. Science, 325(5940), pp. 617-620. Washington, D.C.: American Association for the Advancement of Science 10.1126/science.1172747

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Commensal bacteria in the lower intestine of mammals are 10 times as numerous as the body's cells. We investigated the relative importance of different immune mechanisms in limiting the spread of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we reveal a flexible continuum between innate and adaptive immune function in containing commensal microbes. Mice deficient in critical innate immune functions such as Toll-like receptor signaling or oxidative burst production spontaneously produce high-titer serum antibodies against their commensal microbiota. These antibody responses are functionally essential to maintain host-commensal mutualism in vivo in the face of innate immune deficiency. Spontaneous hyper-activation of adaptive immunity against the intestinal microbiota, secondary to innate immune deficiency, may clarify the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory diseases where immune dysfunction is implicated.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases > Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology

UniBE Contributor:

Hapfelmeier, Siegfried Hektor and Macpherson, Andrew

ISSN:

0036-8075

ISBN:

19644121

Publisher:

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Siegfried Hektor Hapfelmeier-Balmer

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:07

Last Modified:

15 May 2015 11:00

Publisher DOI:

10.1126/science.1172747

PubMed ID:

19644121

Web of Science ID:

000268493000052

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/29612 (FactScience: 153959)

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