Lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (1): systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with body mass index

Harriss, D J; Atkinson, G; George, K; Cable, N Tim; Reilly, T; Haboubi, N; Zwahlen, M; Egger, M; Renehan, A G (2009). Lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (1): systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with body mass index. Colorectal disease, 11(6), pp. 547-563. Oxford: Blackwell Science 10.1111/j.1463-1318.2009.01766.x

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OBJECTIVE: Excess body weight, defined by body mass index (BMI), may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. As a prerequisite to the determination of lifestyle attributable risks, we undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies to quantify colorectal cancer risk associated with increased BMI and explore for differences by gender, sub-site and study characteristics. METHOD: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (to December 2007), and other sources, selecting reports based on strict inclusion criteria. Random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions of study-specific incremental estimates were performed to determine the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with a 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI. RESULTS: We analysed 29 datasets from 28 articles, including 67,361 incident cases. Higher BMI was associated with colon (RR 1.24, 95% CIs: 1.20-1.28) and rectal (1.09, 1.05-1.14) cancers in men, and with colon cancer (1.09, 1.04-1.12) in women. Associations were stronger in men than in women for colon (P < 0.001) and rectal (P = 0.005) cancers. Associations were generally consistent across geographic populations. Study characteristics and adjustments accounted for only moderate variations of associations. CONCLUSION: Increasing BMI is associated with a modest increased risk of developing colon and rectal cancers, but this modest risk may translate to large attributable proportions in high-prevalence obese populations. Inter-gender differences point to potentially important mechanistic differences, which merit further research.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Zwahlen, Marcel and Egger, Matthias

ISSN:

1462-8910

ISBN:

19207714

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:09

Last Modified:

23 Jun 2015 17:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1463-1318.2009.01766.x

PubMed ID:

19207714

Web of Science ID:

000266874100002

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.30237

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/30237 (FactScience: 191542)

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