Multimeric tyrosine sulfate acts as an endothelial cell protectant and prevents complement activation in xenotransplantation models

Laumonier, Thomas; Walpen, Alexander J; Matozan, Katja M; Korchagina, Elena Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Haeberli, André; Mohacsi, Paul J; Rieben, Robert (2004). Multimeric tyrosine sulfate acts as an endothelial cell protectant and prevents complement activation in xenotransplantation models. Xenotransplantation, 11(3), pp. 262-8. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley 10.1111/j.1399-3089.2004.00125.x

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BACKGROUND: Activation of endothelial cells (EC) in xenotransplantation is mostly induced through binding of antibodies (Ab) and activation of the complement system. Activated EC lose their heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) layer and exhibit a procoagulant and pro-inflammatory cell surface. We have recently shown that the semi-synthetic proteoglycan analog dextran sulfate (DXS, MW 5000) blocks activation of the complement cascade and acts as an EC-protectant both in vitro and in vivo. However, DXS is a strong anticoagulant and systemic use of this substance in a clinical setting might therefore be compromised. It was the aim of this study to investigate a novel, fully synthetic EC-protectant with reduced inhibition of the coagulation system. METHOD: By screening with standard complement (CH50) and coagulation assays (activated partial thromboplastin time, aPTT), a conjugate of tyrosine sulfate to a polymer-backbone (sTyr-PAA) was identified as a candidate EC-protectant. The pathway-specificity of complement inhibition by sTyr-PAA was tested in hemolytic assays. To further characterize the substance, the effects of sTyr-PAA and DXS on complement deposition on pig cells were compared by flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assays. Using fluorescein-labeled sTyr-PAA (sTyr-PAA-Fluo), the binding of sTyr-PAA to cell surfaces was also investigated. RESULTS: Of all tested compounds, sTyr-PAA was the most effective substance in inhibiting all three pathways of complement activation. Its capacity to inhibit the coagulation cascade was significantly reduced as compared with DXS. sTyr-PAA also dose-dependently inhibited deposition of human complement on pig cells and this inhibition correlated with the binding of sTyr-PAA to the cells. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate that sTyr-PAA binds preferentially and dose-dependently to damaged EC. CONCLUSIONS: We could show that sTyr-PAA acts as an EC-protectant by binding to the cells and protecting them from complement-mediated damage. It has less effect on the coagulation system than DXS and may therefore have potential for in vivo application.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Forschungsbereich Mu50 > Forschungsgruppe Herz und Gefässe
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Thromboselabor Kinderklinik (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Walpen, Alexander; Matozan, Katja; Haeberli, André and Rieben, Robert

ISSN:

0908-665X

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:12

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1399-3089.2004.00125.x

PubMed ID:

15099206

Web of Science ID:

000220888700006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/31672 (FactScience: 196320)

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