Histo-blood group antigens as allo- and autoantigens

Nydegger, Urs E; Tevaearai, Hendrik; Berdat, Pascal; Rieben, Robert; Carrel, Thierry; Mohacsi, Paul; Flegel, Willy A (2005). Histo-blood group antigens as allo- and autoantigens. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1050, pp. 40-51. Boston, Mass.: Blackwell 10.1196/annals.1313.006

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The science of blood groups has made giant steps forward during the last decade. Blood-group typing of red blood cells (RBCs) is performed on more than 15 million samples per year in Europe, today much less often for forensic reasons than for clinical purposes such as transfusion and organ transplantation. Specific monoclonal antibodies are used with interpretation on the basis of RBC agglutination patterns, and mass genotyping may well be on its way to becoming a routine procedure. The discovery that most blood group systems, whose antigens are by definition found on RBCs, are also expressed in multiple other tissues has sparked the interest of transplantation medicine in immunohematology beyond the HLA system. The one and only "histo-blood group" (HBG) system that is routinely considered in transplantation medicine is ABO, because ABO antigen-incompatible donor/recipient constellations are preferably avoided. However, other HBG systems may also play a role, thus far underestimated. This paper is an up-to-date analysis of the importance of HBG systems in the alloimmunity of transplantation and autoimmune events, such as hemolytic anemia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Forschungsbereich Mu50 > Forschungsgruppe Herz und Gefässe

UniBE Contributor:

Rieben, Robert

ISSN:

0077-8923

Publisher:

Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:12

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1196/annals.1313.006

PubMed ID:

16014519

Web of Science ID:

000231874600005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/31676 (FactScience: 196325)

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