Elevated serum triiodothyronine and intellectual and motor disability with paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by a monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene mutation

Fuchs, Oliver; Pfarr, Nicole; Pohlenz, Joachim; Schmidt, Heinrich (2009). Elevated serum triiodothyronine and intellectual and motor disability with paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by a monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene mutation. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 51(3), pp. 240-4. Oxford: Blackwell 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2008.03125.x

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Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 or SLC16A2) is important for the neuronal uptake of triiodothyronine (T3) in its function as a specific and active transporter of thyroid hormones across the cell membrane, thus being essential for human brain development. We report on a German male with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome presenting with severe intellectual and motor disability, paroxysmal dyskinesia combined with truncal muscular hypotonia, and peripheral muscular hypertonia at his current age of 9 years. Additionally, the patient has a lesion in the left putamen region revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and elevated serum T3 levels. The male appeared to have a hemizygous mutation (R271H) in the MCT8 gene that was sequenced directly from genomic DNA and occurred de novo in the maternal germline, as both his mother and his sister were not carriers of the mutation. Ruling out a common polymorphism, 50 normal individuals of the same ethnic background did not harbour the mutation. The identified MCT8 gene mutation (R271H) is very likely to be the genetic cause for neuronal hypothyroidism despite elevated serum T3 levels.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Fuchs, Oliver

ISSN:

0012-1622

Publisher:

Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:12

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1469-8749.2008.03125.x

PubMed ID:

19018842

Web of Science ID:

000263519600014

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/31844 (FactScience: 196591)

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