An outbreak of mumps in a population partially vaccinated with the Rubini strain

Germann, D; Ströhle, A; Eggenberger, K; Steiner, C A; Matter, L (1996). An outbreak of mumps in a population partially vaccinated with the Rubini strain. Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases, 28(3), pp. 235-8. Oslo: Informa Healthcare 10.3109/00365549609027163

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Since 1991, 6 years after the recommendation of universal childhood triple vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella (M + M + R), Switzerland has been confronted with an increasing number of mumps cases affecting both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. The M + M + R vaccine mainly used in the Swiss population after 1986 contains the highly attenuated Rubini strain of mumps virus. We analysed an outbreak of 102 suspected mumps cases by virus isolation, determination of IgM antibodies to mumps virus in 27 acute phase sera, and verification of vaccination histories. Mumps was confirmed by virus isolation in 88 patients, of whom 72 had previously received the Rubini vaccine strain. IgM antibodies to mumps virus were detected in 24/27 acute phase serum samples. A group of 92 subjects from the same geographic area without signs of mumps virus infection served as controls. IgG antibodies to mumps virus and vaccination status were assessed in these children. The vaccination rate in these controls was 61%, with equal seropositivity for unvaccinated and Rubini-vaccinated subjects. These data support other recent reports which indicate an insufficient protective efficacy of current mumps vaccines.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Staffelbach, Sabine

ISSN:

0036-5548

Publisher:

Informa Healthcare

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:12

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:23

Publisher DOI:

10.3109/00365549609027163

PubMed ID:

8863352

Web of Science ID:

A1996VC26400005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/31881 (FactScience: 196653)

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