Bacterial phenotype variants in group B streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

Sendi, Parham; Johansson, Linda; Dahesh, Samira; Van-Sorge, Nina M; Darenberg, Jessica; Norgren, Mari; Sjölin, Jan; Nizet, Victor; Norrby-Teglund, Anna (2009). Bacterial phenotype variants in group B streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Emerging infectious diseases, 15(2), pp. 223-232. Atlanta, Ga.: U.S. National Center for Infectious Diseases 10.3201/eid1502.080990

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We conducted genetic and functional analyses of isolates from a patient with group B streptococcal (GBS) necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Tissue cultures simultaneously showed colonies with high hemolysis (HH) and low hemolysis (LH). Conversely, the HH and LH variants exhibited low capsule (LC) and high capsule (HC) expression, respectively. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the 2 GBS variants were of the same clonal origin. Genetic analysis found a 3-bp deletion in the covR gene of the HH/LC variant. Functionally, this isolate was associated with an increased growth rate in vitro and with higher interleukin-8 induction. However, in whole blood, opsonophagocytic and intracellular killing assays, the LH/HC phenotype demonstrated higher resistance to host phagocytic killing. In a murine model, LH/HC resulted in higher levels of bacteremia and increased host mortality rate. These findings demonstrate differences in GBS isolates of the same clonal origin but varying phenotypes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology

UniBE Contributor:

Sendi, Parham

ISSN:

1080-6040

Publisher:

U.S. National Center for Infectious Diseases

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:14

Last Modified:

10 Oct 2019 14:00

Publisher DOI:

10.3201/eid1502.080990

PubMed ID:

19193266

Web of Science ID:

000263230700011

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.32464

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/32464 (FactScience: 197672)

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