Staphylococcus aureus as an intracellular pathogen: the role of small colony variants

Sendi, Parham; Proctor, Richard A (2009). Staphylococcus aureus as an intracellular pathogen: the role of small colony variants. Trends in microbiology, 17(2), pp. 54-8. Cambridge: Elsevier Current Trends 10.1016/j.tim.2008.11.004

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Increasing evidence indicates that Staphylococcus aureus might be a facultative intracellular pathogen. In particular, certain subpopulations, called small colony variants (SCVs), seem to be well adapted to the intracellular milieu. When compared to 'normal' staphylococcal strains, SCVs show increased uptake by host cells, resistance to intracellular defenses and reduced stimulation of host defenses. We propose that the ability to form two subpopulations with different phenotypes might allow S. aureus the option for both extra- cellular and intra-cellular survival in the host.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology

UniBE Contributor:

Sendi, Parham

ISSN:

0966-842X

Publisher:

Elsevier Current Trends

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:14

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.tim.2008.11.004

PubMed ID:

19162480

Web of Science ID:

000264279200002

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/32465 (FactScience: 197673)

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