Aspirin vs anticoagulation in carotid artery dissection: a study of 298 patients

Georgiadis, D; Arnold, M; von Buedingen, H C; Valko, P; Sarikaya, H; Rousson, V; Mattle, H P; Bousser, M G; Baumgartner, R W (2009). Aspirin vs anticoagulation in carotid artery dissection: a study of 298 patients. Neurologic clinics, 72(21), pp. 1810-5. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a2a50a

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

BACKGROUND: No randomized study has yet compared efficacy and safety of aspirin and anticoagulants in patients with spontaneous dissection of the cervical carotid artery (sICAD). METHODS: Prospectively collected data from 298 consecutive patients with sICAD (56% men; mean age 46 +/- 10 years) treated with anticoagulants alone (n = 202) or aspirin alone (n = 96) were retrospectively analyzed. Admission diagnosis was ischemic stroke in 165, TIA in 37, retinal ischemia in 8, and local symptoms and signs (headache, neck pain, Horner syndrome, cranial nerve palsy) in 80 patients, while 8 patients were asymptomatic. Clinical follow-up was obtained after 3 months by neurologic examination (97% of patients) or structured telephone interview. Outcome measures were 1) new cerebral ischemic events, defined as ischemic stroke, TIA, or retinal ischemia, 2) symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and 3) major extracranial bleeding. RESULTS: During follow-up, ischemic events were rare (ischemic stroke, 0.3%; TIA, 3.4%; retinal ischemia, 1%); their frequency did not significantly differ between patients treated with anticoagulants (5.9%) and those treated with aspirin (2.1%). The same was true for hemorrhagic adverse events (anticoagulants, 2%; aspirin, 1%). New ischemic events were significantly more frequent in patients with ischemic events at onset (6.2%) than in patients with local symptoms or asymptomatic patients (1.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of a nonrandomized study, our data suggest that frequency of new cerebral and retinal ischemic events in patients with spontaneous dissection of the cervical carotid artery is low and probably independent of the type of antithrombotic treatment (aspirin or anticoagulants).

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Mattle, Heinrich

ISSN:

0733-8619

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:14

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:24

Publisher DOI:

10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a2a50a

PubMed ID:

19321846

Web of Science ID:

000266439300004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/32630 (FactScience: 197882)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback