Unmyelinated afferents in human skin and their responsiveness to low temperature

Campero, Mario; Bostock, Hugh (2010). Unmyelinated afferents in human skin and their responsiveness to low temperature. Neuroscience letters, 470(3), pp. 188-92. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.neulet.2009.06.089

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In humans, there are different types of cutaneous cold-sensitive afferents responsible for cold sensation and cold pain. Innocuous cold is primarily mediated by a population of slow A delta afferents, based on psychophysical and neurophysiological studies. Noxious cold (usually below 15 degrees C) is mediated, at least in part, by polymodal nociceptors. There is also a population of unmyelinated afferents responsive to innocuous low temperature, some of which also respond to heat, whose sensory function has not been completely defined. A paradoxical hot/burning evoked by cooling is unmasked by A-fibre block, and similar sensations are evoked by applying simultaneous cool and warm stimuli to adjacent skin areas. These unmyelinated fibres activated by innocuous cooling (and heating) may contribute to this hot/burning sensation, along with other thermoregulatory functions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Bostock, Hugh

ISSN:

0304-3940

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:14

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.neulet.2009.06.089

PubMed ID:

19576956

Web of Science ID:

000275312700008

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/3344 (FactScience: 207004)

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