Identification of problems in functioning of people with sleep disorders in a clinical setting using the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) Checklist

Gradinger, Felix; Glässel, Andrea; Gugger, Matthias; Cieza, Alarcos; Braun, Nathalie; Khatami, Ramin; Schmitt, Wolfgang; Mathis, Johannes (2011). Identification of problems in functioning of people with sleep disorders in a clinical setting using the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) Checklist. Journal of sleep research, 20(3), pp. 445-53. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1365-2869.2010.00888.x

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

We conducted an explorative, cross-sectional, multi-centre study in order to identify the most common problems of people with any kind of (primary) sleep disorder in a clinical setting using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a frame of reference. Data were collected from patients using a structured face-to-face interview of 45-60 min duration. A case record form for health professionals containing the extended ICF Checklist, sociodemographic variables and disease-specific variables was used. The study centres collected data of 99 individuals with sleep disorders. The identified categories include 48 (32%) for body functions, 13 (9%) body structures, 55 (37%) activities and participation and 32 (22%) for environmental factors. 'Sleep functions' (100%) and 'energy and drive functions', respectively, (85%) were the most severely impaired second-level categories of body functions followed by 'attention functions' (78%) and 'temperament and personality functions' (77%). With regard to the component activities and participation, patients felt most restricted in the categories of 'watching' (e.g. TV) (82%), 'recreation and leisure' (75%) and 'carrying out daily routine' (74%). Within the component environmental factors the categories 'support of immediate family', 'health services, systems and policies' and 'products or substances for personal consumption [medication]' were the most important facilitators; 'time-related changes', 'light' and 'climate' were the most important barriers. The study identified a large variety of functional problems reflecting the complexity of sleep disorders. The ICF has the potential to provide a comprehensive framework for the description of functional health in individuals with sleep disorders in a clinical setting.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Mathis, Johannes

ISSN:

0962-1105

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:14

Last Modified:

16 Jul 2018 15:20

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1365-2869.2010.00888.x

PubMed ID:

20887394

Web of Science ID:

000293176500009

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/3371 (FactScience: 207041)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback