Ecological explanations for (incomplete) speciation

Nosil, Patrik; Harmon, Luke J.; Seehausen, Ole (2009). Ecological explanations for (incomplete) speciation. Trends in ecology & evolution, 24(3), pp. 145-156. Amsterdam: Elsevier Current Trends 10.1016/j.tree.2008.10.011

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Divergent natural selection has been shown to promote speciation in many taxa. However, although divergent selection often initiates the process of speciation, it often fails to complete it. Several time-based, geographic and genetic factors have been recognized to explain this variability in how far speciation proceeds. We review here recent evidence indicating that variability in the completeness of speciation can also be associated with the nature of divergent selection itself, with speciation being greatly promoted by (i) stronger selection on a given, single trait (the 'stronger selection' hypothesis) and (ii) selection on a greater number of traits (the 'multifarious selection' hypothesis). However, evidence for each selective hypothesis is still scarce, and further work is required to determine their relative importance.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Aquatic Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Seehausen, Ole

ISSN:

0169-5347

ISBN:

0169-5347

Publisher:

Elsevier Current Trends

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:22

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 14:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.tree.2008.10.011

Web of Science ID:

000264615200005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/36778 (FactScience: 206177)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback