Quality controls for two heel bone ultrasounds used in the Swiss Evaluation of the Methods of Measurement of Osteoporotic Fracture Risk Study

Krieg, M A; Cornuz, J; Hartl, F; Kraenzlin, M; Tyndall, A; Häuselmann, H J; Lippuner, K; Rizzoli, R; Büche, D; Theiler, R; Dambacher, M A; Neff, M; Pancaldi, P; Tanzi, F; Wimpfheimer, K; Burckhardt, P (2002). Quality controls for two heel bone ultrasounds used in the Swiss Evaluation of the Methods of Measurement of Osteoporotic Fracture Risk Study. Journal of clinical densitometry, 5(4), pp. 335-41. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1385/JCD:5:4:335

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Because of the important morbidity and mortality associated with osteoporosis, it is essential to detect subjects at risk by screening methods, such as bone quantitative ultrasounds (QUSs). Several studies showed that QUS could predict fractures. None, however, compared prospectively different QUS devices, and few data of quality controls (QCs) have been published. The Swiss Evaluation of the Methods of Measurement of Osteoporotic Fracture Risk is a prospective multicenter study that compared three QUSs for the assessment of hip fracture risk in a population of 7609 women age >/=70 yr. Because the inclusion phase lasted 20 mo, and because 10 centers participated in this study, QC became a major issue. We therefore developed a QC procedure to assess the stability and precision of the devices, and for their cross-calibration. Our study focuses on the two heel QUSs. The water bath system (Achilles+) had a higher precision than the dry system (Sahara). The QC results were highly dependent on temperature. QUS stability was acceptable, but Sahara must be calibrated regularly. A sufficient homogeneity among all the Sahara devices could be demonstrated, whereas significant differences were found among the Achilles+ devices. For speed of sound, 52% of the differences among the Achilles+ was explained by the water s temperature. However, for broadband ultrasound attenuation, a maximal difference of 23% persisted after adjustment for temperature. Because such differences could influence measurements in vivo, it is crucial to develop standardized phantoms to be used in prospective multicenter studies.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Osteoporosis

UniBE Contributor:

Lippuner, Kurt

ISSN:

1094-6950

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:24

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 22:52

Publisher DOI:

10.1385/JCD:5:4:335

PubMed ID:

12665633

Web of Science ID:

000180491800002

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/37859 (FactScience: 212046)

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