Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion maintains nutritional state in patients with aerodigestive tract cancer

Beer, Karl T; Krause, Kerstin B; Zuercher, Theres; Stanga, Zeno (2005). Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion maintains nutritional state in patients with aerodigestive tract cancer. Nutrition and cancer - an international journal, 52(1), pp. 29-34. Philadelphia, Pa.: Routledge 10.1207/s15327914nc5201_4

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Patients with upper aerodigestive tract (UAT) cancers often suffer from malnutrition and compromised functional ability. We compared clinical outcome with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube feeding begun at two different time points. The records of 151 patients with UAT carcinomas were reviewed retrospectively. We included patients undergoing radical radiochemotherapy and PEG tube feeding. Subjects were evaluated before PEG insertion and at the end of the treatment. Patients (n=15, 100%) were divided into two groups according to the presence (group A) or absence (group B) of mucositis. Group A (51.7% of patients) received early PEG: before or within 2 wk of radiotherapy. Group B (48.3%) received delayed PEG: between 2 wk and 3 mo after the start of radiotherapy. Mean weight loss was 1.03 kg in group A vs. 4.0 kg in group B, P=0.004. Treatment interruptions were significantly (P=0.01) more common in group B. Early PEG placement at the beginning of radiochemotherapy in patients with UAT tumors maintains the patient's nutritional state and reduces treatment interruptions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition

UniBE Contributor:

Stanga-Nodari, Zeno

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0163-5581

Publisher:

Routledge

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:24

Last Modified:

01 Oct 2020 10:43

Publisher DOI:

10.1207/s15327914nc5201_4

PubMed ID:

16091001

Web of Science ID:

000231482400004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/37906 (FactScience: 215090)

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