The role of specialisation in the promotion of young football talents: A person-oriented study

Zibung, Marc; Conzelmann, Achim (2013). The role of specialisation in the promotion of young football talents: A person-oriented study. European journal of sport science, 13(5), pp. 452-460. Abingdon, UK: Taylor & Francis 10.1080/17461391.2012.749947

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This paper investigates the controversial question whether it is more effective to promote specialisation in a specific sport at the beginning of a career or whether to encourage a broad range of sports when promoting competitive sports talents in order for them to achieve a high level of performance in adulthood. The issue of promoting talents depends on human developmental processes and therefore raises developmental scientific questions. Based on recent, dynamic-interactionist concepts of development, we assume a person-oriented approach focussing on the person as a whole rather than individual features. Theoretical considerations lead to four interacting factors being summarised to form a subsystem: childhood training. The relative weights of these factors lead to patterns. By relating these to a performance criterion at the age of peak performance, particularly promising developmental patterns may be identified. One hundred fifty-nine former Swiss football talents were retrospectively interviewed about their career and the data analysed using the LICUR method. Two early career patterns were identified as having a favourable influence on adult performance. Both are characterised by an above-average amount of in-club training. One pattern also exhibits an above-average amount of informal football played outside the club, the other above-average scores for activity in other sports. Hence, comprehensive training and practice inside and outside the club form the basis for subsequent football expertise.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW) > Sport Science I

UniBE Contributor:

Zibung, Marc Raphael and Conzelmann, Achim

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISSN:

1746-1391

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christian Gutknecht

Date Deposited:

07 Nov 2013 15:34

Last Modified:

30 Jun 2015 02:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/17461391.2012.749947

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.38998

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/38998

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