Cognitive response control in writer's cramp

Berg, D.; Herrmann, M. J.; Müller, T. J.; Strik, W. K.; Aranda, D.; Koenig, T.; Naumann, M.; Fallgatter, A. J. (2001). Cognitive response control in writer's cramp. European journal of neurology, 8(6), pp. 587-594. Blackwell Science 10.1046/j.1468-1331.2001.00298.x

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Disturbances of the motor and sensory system as well as an alteration of the preparation of movements have been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of dystonias. However, it is unclear whether higher aspects of cortical – like cognitive – functions are also involved. Recently, the NoGo-anteriorization (NGA) elicited with a visual continuous performance test (CPT) during recording of a 21-channel electroencephalogram has been proposed as an electrophysiological standard-index for cognitive response control. The NGA consists of a more anterior location of the positive area of the brain electrical field associated with the inhibition (NoGo-condition) compared with that of the execution (Go-condition) of a prepared motor response in the CPT. This response control paradigm was applied in 16 patients with writer’s cramp (WC) and 14 age matched healthy controls. Topographical analysis of the associated event-related potentials revealed a significant (P < 0.05) NGA effect for both patients and controls. Moreover, patients with WC showed a significantly higher global field power value (P < 0.05) in the Go-condition and a significantly higher difference-amplitude (P < 0.05) in the NoGo-condition. A source location analysis with the low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) method demonstrated a hypoactivity for the Go-condition in the parietal cortex of the right hemisphere and a hyperactivity in the NoGo-condition in the left parietal cortex in patients with WC compared with healthy controls. These results indicate an altered response control in patients with WC in widespread cortical brain areas and therefore support the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of WC is not restricted to a pure sensory-motor dysfunction.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > UPD Murtenstrasse
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Thomas Jörg; Strik, Werner and König, Thomas

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1351-5101

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thomas König

Date Deposited:

31 Jan 2014 16:51

Last Modified:

12 Aug 2015 15:29

Publisher DOI:

10.1046/j.1468-1331.2001.00298.x

Uncontrolled Keywords:

brain electrical field, continuous performance test, global fied power, low resolution electromagnetic tomography, NoGo-anteriorization, writer’s cramp

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.39693

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/39693

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