Clinical and pathological analysis of epidural inflammation in intervertebral disk extrusion in dogs

Fadda, A.; Oevermann, A.; Vandevelde, M.; Doherr, Marcus; Forterre, F.; Henke, D. (2013). Clinical and pathological analysis of epidural inflammation in intervertebral disk extrusion in dogs. Journal of veterinary internal medicine, 27(4), pp. 924-934. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/jvim.12095

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BACKGROUND Little is known about the pathologic changes in the epidural space after intervertebral disk (IVD) extrusion in the dog. OBJECTIVES To analyze the pathology of the epidural inflammatory response, and to search for correlations between this process and clinical findings. METHODS Clinical data from 105 chondrodystrophic (CD) and nonchondrodystrophic (NCD) dogs with IVD extrusion were recorded. Epidural material from these dogs was examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Using statistical analysis, we searched for correlations between severity of epidural inflammation and various clinical and pathologic variables. RESULTS Most dogs exhibited an epidural inflammatory response, ranging from acute invasion of neutrophils to formation of chronic granulation tissue. The mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates consisted mostly of monocytes and macrophages and only few T and B cells. Surprisingly, chronic inflammatory patterns also were found in animals with an acute clinical history. Severity of the epidural inflammation correlated with degree of the epidural hemorrhage and nucleus pulposus calcification (P = .003 and .040), but not with age, chondrodystrophic phenotype, neurologic grade, back pain, pretreatment, or duration. The degree of inflammation was statistically (P = .021) inversely correlated with the ability to regain ambulation. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE Epidural inflammation occurs in the majority of dogs with IVD extrusion and may develop long before the onset of clinical signs. Presence of calcified IVD material and hemorrhage in the epidural space may be the triggers of this lesion rather than an adaptive immune response to the nucleus pulposus as suggested in previous studies. Because epidural inflammation may affect outcome, further research is warranted.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Veterinary Public Health / Herd Health Management
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Fadda, Angela; Oevermann, Anna; Vandevelde, Marc; Doherr, Marcus; Forterre, Franck and Henke, Diana

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0891-6640

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

05 Mar 2014 13:46

Last Modified:

11 Oct 2018 17:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jvim.12095

Related URLs:

PubMed ID:

23647367

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Immune response Intervertebral disk herniation Nucleus pulposus

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40386

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40386

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