Halitosis and tongue coating in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease versus nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease

Kislig, Karin; Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Bornstein, Michael; Lussi, Adrian; Seemann, Rainer (2013). Halitosis and tongue coating in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease versus nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease. Clinical oral investigations, 17(1), pp. 159-65. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00784-012-0705-5

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OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with diagnosed erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (ERD) have an increased probability of halitosis and tongue coating compared to patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-six patients (33 males and 33 females) were recruited for the study and received an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence of ERD (n = 31) and NERD (n = 35) was classified based on the Los Angeles classification for erosive changes in the esophagus. Additionally, the patients filled in a questionnaire regarding their subjective assessment of halitosis, and an organoleptic assessment of halitosis, a measurement of oral volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) with the Halimeter, and a tongue coating index were performed. ERD and NERD subjects were compared with regard to Halitosis-related clinical and anamnestic findings. RESULTS No statistically significant difference could be found between ERD and NERD patients regarding tongue coating index, organoleptic scores, and VSC values as well as self-perceived bad taste, tongue coating, and bad breath. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that halitosis is not typically associated with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and the presence of esophageal mucosal damage (ERD patients). CLINICAL RELEVANCE The data of this investigation support the findings of interdisciplinary bad breath clinics that gastroesophageal reflux disease is not a leading cause for halitosis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Preventive, Restorative and Pediatric Dentistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology

UniBE Contributor:

Kislig, Karin; Bornstein, Michael; Lussi, Adrian and Seemann, Rainer

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1432-6981

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

18 Feb 2014 11:38

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2018 15:11

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00784-012-0705-5

PubMed ID:

22437377

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40404

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40404

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