Biomechanical evaluation of the stabilizing function of the atlantoaxial ligaments under shear loading: A canine cadaveric study

Reber, Katrine; Bürki, Alexander; Vizcaino Reves, Nuria; Stoffel, Michael Hubert; Gendron, Karine; Ferguson, Stephen J; Forterre, Franck (2013). Biomechanical evaluation of the stabilizing function of the atlantoaxial ligaments under shear loading: A canine cadaveric study. Veterinary surgery, 42(8), pp. 918-923. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2013.12064.x

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OBJECTIVES To evaluate the stabilizing function of atlanto-axial ligaments in dogs. STUDY DESIGN Cadaveric biomechanical study. ANIMALS Beagle dog cadavers (n = 10). METHODS The craniocervical region was collected from 10 Beagle cadavers, and the occipito-atlanto-axial region was prepared and freed from the surrounding muscles. Care was taken to preserve integrity of the atlantoaxial ligaments and atlantoaxial joint capsule. The atlanto-occipital joints were blocked with 2 diverging transarticular 1.8 mm positive threaded K-wires. Specimen extremities were embedded in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and mounted on a simulator testing shear load at the atlantoaxial joint. Range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) were determined with all ligaments intact, after cutting the apical ligament, both alar ligaments, the transverse ligaments and finally after cutting the dorsal atlantoaxial ligament. RESULTS ROM increased similarly and stepwise during testing. The most significant increase was observed after transection of the alar ligaments. CONCLUSION The alar ligaments seem to be the most important ligamentous structures for stabilization of the atlantoaxial joint under shear load.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute for Surgical Technology & Biomechanics ISTB
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Anatomy
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Reber, Katrine; Bürki, Alexander; Vizcaíno Revés, Núria; Stoffel, Michael Hubert; Gendron, Karine; Ferguson, Stephen John and Forterre, Franck

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0161-3499

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simone Forterre

Date Deposited:

05 Mar 2014 14:38

Last Modified:

12 Oct 2015 15:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1532-950X.2013.12064.x

Related URLs:

PubMed ID:

24117887

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40409

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40409

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