Recent skin self-examination and doctor visits in relation to melanoma risk and tumour depth

Titus, L. J.; Clough-Gorr, K.; Mackenzie, T. A.; Perry, A.; Spencer, S. K.; Weiss, J.; Abrahams-Gessel, S.; Ernstoff, M. S. (2013). Recent skin self-examination and doctor visits in relation to melanoma risk and tumour depth. British journal of dermatology, 168(3), pp. 571-576. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/bjd.12003

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BACKGROUND Little is known about the potential benefit of skin self-examination for melanoma prevention and early detection. Objectives: To determine whether skin self-examination is associated with reduced melanoma risk, self-detection of tumours, and reduced risk of deeper melanomas. METHODS We used data from a population-based case-control study (423 cases, 678 controls) to assess recent skin self-examination in relation to self-detection, melanoma risk and tumour depth ( ≤1 mm; > 1 mm). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for associations of interest. RESULTS Skin self-examination conducted 1-11 times during a recent year was associated with a possible decrease in melanoma risk (OR 0·74; 95% CI 0·54-1·02). Melanoma risk was decreased for those who conducted skin self-examination and saw a doctor (OR 0·52; 95% CI 0·30-0·90). Among cases, those who examined their skin were twice as likely to self-detect the melanoma (OR 2·23; 95% CI 1·47-3·38), but self-detection was not associated with shallower tumours. Tumour depth was reduced for those who conducted skin self-examination 1-11 times during a recent year (OR 0·39; 95% CI 0·18-0·81), but was not influenced by seeing a doctor, or by conducting skin self-examination and seeing a doctor. CONCLUSIONS Risk of a deeper tumour and possibly risk of melanoma were reduced by skin self-examination 1-11 times annually. Melanoma risk was markedly reduced by skin self-examination coupled with a doctor visit. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that our findings reflect bias or confounding. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of skin self-examination for melanoma prevention and early detection.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Clough, Kerri

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0007-0963

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

12 Feb 2014 16:19

Last Modified:

02 Jan 2015 22:59

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/bjd.12003

PubMed ID:

22897437

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40739

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40739

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