Efficacy of psychological interventions for sexual dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Frühauf, Sarah Elisabeth; Gerger, Heike; Schmidt, Hannah Maren; Munder, Thomas; Barth, Jürgen (2013). Efficacy of psychological interventions for sexual dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 42(6), pp. 915-933. Springer 10.1007/s10508-012-0062-0

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Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent in the general population and associated with psychological distress and impaired sexual satisfaction. Psychological interventions are promising treatment options, as sexual dysfunction is frequently caused by and deteriorates because of psychological factors. However, research into the efficacy of psychological interventions is rather scarce and an up-to-date review of outcome studies is currently lacking. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available studies from 1980 to 2009 to examine the efficacy of psychological interventions for patients with sexual dysfunction. A total of 20 randomized controlled studies comparing a psychological intervention with a wait-list were included in the meta-analysis. The overall post-treatment effect size for symptom severity was d = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.40 to 0.77) and for sexual satisfaction d = 0.47 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.70). Psychological interventions were shown to especially improve symptom severity for women with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder and orgasmic disorder. Our systematic review of 14 studies comparing at least two active interventions head-to-head revealed that very few comparative studies are available with large variability in effect sizes across studies (d between -0.69 and 2.29 for symptom severity and -0.56 and 14.02 for sexual satisfaction). In conclusion, psychological interventions are effective treatment options for sexual dysfunction. However, evidence varies considerably across single disorders. Good evidence exists to date for female hypoactive sexual desire disorder and female orgasmic disorder. Further research is needed on psychological interventions for other sexual dysfunctions, their long-term and comparative effects.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Frühauf, Sarah Elisabeth; Gerger, Heike; Munder, Thomas and Barth, Jürgen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0004-0002

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beatrice Minder Wyssmann

Date Deposited:

12 Feb 2014 17:24

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2014 23:51

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10508-012-0062-0

PubMed ID:

23559141

Additional Information:

Frühauf and Gerger contributed equally to this work.

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40752

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40752

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