Patterns of exposure to infectious diseases and social contacts in early life and risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents: an International Case-Control Study (CEFALO)

Andersen, T V; Schmidt, L S; Poulsen, A H; Feychting, M; Röösli, M; Tynes, T; Aydin, D; Prochazka, M; Lannering, B; Klæboe, L; Eggen, T; Kuehni, C E; Schmiegelow, K; Schüz, J (2013). Patterns of exposure to infectious diseases and social contacts in early life and risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents: an International Case-Control Study (CEFALO). British journal of cancer, 108(11), pp. 2346-2353. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/bjc.2013.201

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BACKGROUND Infectious diseases and social contacts in early life have been proposed to modulate brain tumour risk during late childhood and adolescence. METHODS CEFALO is an interview-based case-control study in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland, including children and adolescents aged 7-19 years with primary intracranial brain tumours diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 and matched population controls. RESULTS The study included 352 cases (participation rate: 83%) and 646 controls (71%). There was no association with various measures of social contacts: daycare attendance, number of childhours at daycare, attending baby groups, birth order or living with other children. Cases of glioma and embryonal tumours had more frequent sick days with infections in the first 6 years of life compared with controls. In 7-19 year olds with 4+ monthly sick day, the respective odds ratios were 2.93 (95% confidence interval: 1.57-5.50) and 4.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.24-14.30). INTERPRETATION There was little support for the hypothesis that social contacts influence childhood and adolescent brain tumour risk. The association between reported sick days due to infections and risk of glioma and embryonal tumour may reflect involvement of immune functions, recall bias or inverse causality and deserve further attention.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Kühni, Claudia

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0007-0920

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Beatrice Minder Wyssmann

Date Deposited:

19 Feb 2014 14:41

Last Modified:

23 Jul 2015 15:14

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/bjc.2013.201

PubMed ID:

23652309

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40776

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40776

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