The cobblers stick to their lasts: pollinators prefer native over alien plant species in a multi-species experiment

Chrobock, Thomas; Winiger, Pius; Fischer, Markus; van Kleunen, Mark (2013). The cobblers stick to their lasts: pollinators prefer native over alien plant species in a multi-species experiment. Biological invasions, 15(11), pp. 2577-2588. Springer Netherlands 10.1007/s10530-013-0474-3

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The majority of plant species rely, at least partly, on animals for pollination. Our knowledge on whether pollinator visitation differs between native and alien plant species, and between invasive and non-invasive alien species is still limited. Additionally, because numerous invasive plant species are escapees from horticulture, the transition from human-assisted occurrence in urbanized habitats to unassisted persistence and spread in (semi-)natural habitats requires study. To address whether pollinator visitation differs between native, invasive alien and non-invasive alien species, we did pollinator observations for a total of 17 plant species representing five plant families. To test whether pollinator visitation to the three groups of species during the initial stage of invasion depends on habitat type, we did the study in three urbanized habitats and three semi-natural grasslands, using single potted plants. Native plants had more but smaller flower units than alien plants, and invasive alien plants had more but smaller flowers than non-invasive alien plants. After accounting for these differences in floral display, pollinator visitation was higher for native than for alien plant species, but did not differ between invasive and non-invasive alien plant species. Pollinator visitation was on average higher in semi-natural than in urbanized habitats, irrespective of origin or status of the plant species. This might suggest that once an alien species has managed to escape from urbanized into more natural habitats, pollinator limitation will not be a major barrier to establishment and invasion.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant Ecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Chrobock, Thomas; Winiger, Pius; Fischer, Markus and van Kleunen, Mark

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

1387-3547

Publisher:

Springer Netherlands

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

21 Feb 2014 11:08

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 23:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10530-013-0474-3

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Habitat transition, Introduced plant species, Invasive plant species, Plant invasion, Pollination, Pollinator visitation

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.40910

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/40910

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