Fit between situational and dispositional goal orientation, and its effects on flow experience and affective well-being during sports.

Oertig, Daniela; Schüler, Julia; Buchli, Robert (2013). Fit between situational and dispositional goal orientation, and its effects on flow experience and affective well-being during sports. In: Mohiyeddini, Changiz (ed.) Advances in the Psychology of Sports and Exercise: Psychology and Health Research (pp. 141-158). New York: Nova Publishers

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Flow represents an optimal psychological state that is intrinsically rewarding. However, to date only a few studies have investigated the conditions for flow in sports. The present research aims to expand our understanding of the psychological factors that promote the flow experience in sports, focusing on the person-goal fit, or more precisely on the athletes’ situational and dispositional goal orientations. We hypothesize that a fit between an athlete’s situational and dispositional approach versus avoidance goal orientation should promote flow, whereas a non-fit will hinder flow during sports. In addition to the flow experience, we hypothesize that an athlete’s affective well-being is also affected by the person-goal fit. Here our assumptions are theoretically rooted in research on person-environment fit. An experimental study in an ecologically valid sport setting was conducted in order to draw causal conclusions and derive useful strategies for the practice of sports. Specifically, we investigated 67 male soccer players from a regional amateur league during a regular training session. They were randomly assigned to an approach or avoidance goal group and asked to take five penalty shots. Immediately afterwards, their flow experience and affective well-being during the penalty shootout were measured. As predicted, soccer players with a strong dispositional approach goal orientation experienced more flow and reported higher affective well-being when they were assigned to the approach goal. In contrast, soccer players with a strong dispositional avoidance goal orientation benefited from being assigned an avoidance goal in terms of their flow experience and affective well-being. The results are discussed critically with respect to their theoretical and practical implications.

Item Type:

Book Section (Book Chapter)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW)
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Sport Science (ISPW) > Sport Science I

UniBE Contributor:

Schüler, Julia

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
700 Arts > 790 Sports, games & entertainment

ISBN:

978-1-62618-932-4

Publisher:

Nova Publishers

Language:

English

Submitter:

Corinne Ammann

Date Deposited:

05 Mar 2014 16:02

Last Modified:

18 Nov 2019 09:23

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Psychology of Emotions, Motivations and Actions, Sports and Athletics Preparation, Performance, and Psychology

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.41251

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/41251

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