Predictors of health care professionals' attitudes towards involvement in safety-relevant behaviours

Davis, Rachel; Briggs, Merrillee; Arora, Sonal; Moss, Rachel; Schwappach, David (2014). Predictors of health care professionals' attitudes towards involvement in safety-relevant behaviours. Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, 20(1), pp. 12-19. Blackwell Science 10.1111/jep.12073

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BACKGROUND

Patients can make valuable contributions towards promoting the safety of their health care. Health care professionals (HCPs) could play an important role in encouraging patient involvement in safety-relevant behaviours. However, to date factors that determine HCPs' attitudes towards patient participation in this area remain largely unexplored.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate predictors of HCPs' attitudes towards patient involvement in safety-relevant behaviours.

DESIGN

A 22-item cross-sectional fractional factorial survey that assessed HCPs' attitudes towards patient involvement in relation to two error scenarios relating to hand hygiene and medication safety.

SETTING

Four hospitals in London

PARTICIPANTS

Two hundred sixteen HCPs (116 doctors; 100 nurses) aged between 21 and 60 years (mean: 32): 129 female.

OUTCOME MEASURES

Approval of patient's behaviour, HCP response to the patient, anticipated effects on the patient-HCP relationship, support for being asked as a HCP, affective rating response to the vignettes.

RESULTS

HCPs elicited more favourable attitudes towards patients intervening about a medication error than about hand sanitation. Across vignettes and error scenarios, the strongest predictors of attitudes were how the patient intervened and how the HCP responded to the patient's behaviour. With regard to HCP characteristics, doctors viewed patients intervening less favourably than nurses.

CONCLUSIONS

HCPs perceive patients intervening about a potential error less favourably if the patient's behaviour is confrontational in nature or if the HCP responds to the patient intervening in a discouraging manner. In particular, if a HCP responds negatively to the patient (irrespective of whether an error actually occurred), this is perceived as having negative effects on the HCP-patient relationship.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Schwappach, David

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1356-1294

Publisher:

Blackwell Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

19 Mar 2014 17:46

Last Modified:

30 Dec 2014 08:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jep.12073

PubMed ID:

23937633

Uncontrolled Keywords:

health services research medical error patient-centred care

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.41851

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/41851

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