Actigraphic monitoring of physical activity in clinical trials in schizophrenia

Walther, Sebastian (19 February 2014). Actigraphic monitoring of physical activity in clinical trials in schizophrenia (Unpublished). In: International Society for CNS Clinical Trials and Methodology (ISCTM) 10th Anniversary Annual Scientific Meeting. Washington DC, USA. 18.-20.02.2014.

Schizophrenia is still associated with poor outcome, which is mainly related to negative symptoms, reduced physical activity and low quality of life. Physical activity can be objectively measured without distress using wrist actigraphy. The activity levels during the wake periods of the day have been informative on psychopathology and antipsychotic medication. Several studies demonstrated prominent negative symptoms to be associated with reduced activity levels with strongest correlations in chronic patients. Particularly, the avolition score is correlated with reduced activity levels. Moreover, activity levels differ between DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorders and subtypes as well as between patients treated with olanzapine or risperidone. The longitudinal course of activity levels during an psychotic episode demonstrates considerable variance between subjects. During a psychotic episode patients with low activity levels at baseline experience an amelioration of negative symptoms. In contrast, patients with high activity levels at baseline have stable low negative syndrome scores. Between psychotic episodes less variance is observed. Actigraphy is easily applied in schizophrenia and allows collecting large amounts of crosssectional or longitudinal data. With larger numbers of subjects in controlled trials, continuous recording of activity would foster the detection of different outcome trajectories, which may prove as useful groups to target interventions. In clinical trials, activity monitoring may supplement and validate measures of the negative syndrome and its avolition factor or serve as an outcome marker for physical activity, which is important for metabolic issues and quality of life.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Speech)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Walther, Sebastian

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sebastian Walther

Date Deposited:

17 Jul 2014 15:46

Last Modified:

20 Nov 2014 15:21

Related URLs:

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/42618

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