Chronic critical leg ischemia: revascularization of the isolated popliteal segment in comparison with femoro-distal bypass

Mosimann, Urs P.; Stirnemann, P. (1995). Chronic critical leg ischemia: revascularization of the isolated popliteal segment in comparison with femoro-distal bypass. Vasa - European journal of vascular medicine, 24(1), pp. 49-55. Huber

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Several patients with chronic critical limb ischemia show angiographically an isolated popliteal segment (IPS) and a single calf vessel (SCV) with no direct communication to the former. In this situation a bypass can be inserted from the common femoral artery to the IPS or to the SCV. The results of 73 bypass procedures--40 to an isolated popliteal segment and 33 to a single calf vessel for limb salvage--were prospectively evaluated. Eighty percent of the grafts were performed with an autogenous saphenous vein (ASV), the rest with a thin wall polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthesis. The mean age of our patients was 75 years and many suffered from cardiovascular disease. The operative mortality rate was 3% and the mean postoperative survival 32 months. Three year patency and limb salvage rates for ASV grafts was 83% and 87% (IPS) respectively 77% and 76% (MCV); for PTFE grafts 58% and 88% (IPS) respectively 17% and 50% (MCV). There was no significant difference found in patency and limb salvage rates of the two procedures if the graft was an autogenous saphenous vein (p > 0.05). The PTFE prosthesis was only suitable for grafts inserted to the isolated popliteal segment.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Mosimann, Urs Peter

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0301-1526

Publisher:

Huber

Language:

German

Submitter:

Pascal Wurtz

Date Deposited:

18 Jul 2014 09:11

Last Modified:

18 Apr 2017 14:05

PubMed ID:

7725779

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43048

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