Correlation between subjective evaluation of symptoms and objective findings in early recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

Nisa, Lluís; La Macchia, Riccardo; Boujelbene, Noureddine; Sandu, Kishore; Khanfir, Kaouthar; Giger, Roland (2013). Correlation between subjective evaluation of symptoms and objective findings in early recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. JAMA Otolaryngology. Head & Neck Surgery, 139(7), pp. 687-693. American Medical Association 10.1001/jamaoto.2013.3289

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IMPORTANCE This study addresses the value of patients' reported symptoms as markers of tumor recurrence after definitive therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the correlation between patients' symptoms and objective findings in the diagnosis of local and/or regional recurrences of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas in the first 2 years of follow-up. DESIGN Retrospective single-institution study of a prospectively collected database. SETTING Regional hospital. PARTICIPANTS We reviewed the clinical records of patients treated for oral cavity, oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and hypopharyngeal carcinomas between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Correlation between symptoms and oncologic status (recurrence vs remission) in the posttreatment period. RESULTS Of the 101 patients included, 30 had recurrences. Pain, odynophagia, and dysphonia were independently correlated with recurrence (odds ratios, 16.07, 11.20, and 5.90, respectively; P < .001). New-onset symptoms had the best correlation with recurrences. Correlation was better between 6 to 12 and 18 to 21 months after therapy and in patients initially treated unimodally (P < .05). Primary stage and tumor site had no effect. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The correlation between symptoms and oncologic status is low during substantial periods within the first 2 years of follow-up. New-onset symptoms, especially pain, odynophagia, or dysphonia, better correlate with tumor recurrence, especially in patients treated unimodally.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ENT)

UniBE Contributor:

Giger, Roland

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2168-6181

Publisher:

American Medical Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Tschan

Date Deposited:

07 Mar 2014 09:39

Last Modified:

07 Mar 2014 09:39

Publisher DOI:

10.1001/jamaoto.2013.3289

PubMed ID:

23788001

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43447

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