Self-motion perception training: thresholds improve in the light but not in the dark

Hartmann, Matthias; Furrer, Sarah; Herzog, Michael; Merfeld, Daniel M.; Mast, Fred W. (2013). Self-motion perception training: thresholds improve in the light but not in the dark. Experimental brain research, 226(2), pp. 231-240. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00221-013-3428-1

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We investigated perceptual learning in self-motion perception. Blindfolded participants were displaced leftward or rightward by means of a motion platform and asked to indicate the direction of motion. A total of eleven participants underwent 3,360 practice trials, distributed over twelve (Experiment 1) or 6 days (Experiment 2). We found no improvement in motion discrimination in both experiments. These results are surprising since perceptual learning has been demonstrated for visual, auditory, and somatosensory discrimination. Improvements in the same task were found when visual input was provided (Experiment 3). The multisensory nature of vestibular information is discussed as a possible explanation of the absence of perceptual learning in darkness.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology
10 Strategic Research Centers > Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory (CCLM)

UniBE Contributor:

Hartmann, Matthias; Furrer, Sarah and Mast, Fred

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0014-4819

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Matthias Maalouli-Hartmann

Date Deposited:

11 Apr 2014 13:54

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2018 13:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00221-013-3428-1

PubMed ID:

23392475

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.43479

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43479

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