Predictors of depressed mood 12 months after injury. Contribution of self-efficacy and social support

Pjanic, Irena; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Bachmann, Monica S.; Siegenthaler, Franziska; Hoffmann-Richter, Ulrike; Znoj, Hansjörg (2013). Predictors of depressed mood 12 months after injury. Contribution of self-efficacy and social support. Disability and Rehabilitation, 36(15), pp. 1258-1263. Informa Healthcare 10.3109/09638288.2013.837971

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Abstract Purpose: There is evidence that depressed mood and perception of pain are related in patients with chronic illness. However, how individual resources such as self-efficacy and social support play a role in this association remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both variables as either moderator or mediator. Method: In a longitudinal study, 274 injured workers (M = 43.24 years) were investigated. Data were collected on sociodemographics, depressed mood, pain, social support, and self-efficacy at three months post-injury, and depressed mood one year post-injury. Results: Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses revealed that pain (β = 0.14; p < 0.01) and social support (β = -0.18; p < 0.001) were significant predictors of depressed mood. Self-efficacy moderated the relationship of pain (β = -0.12; p < 0.05) and depressed mood after one year. Lower self-efficacy in combination with pain had a stronger impact than higher self-efficacy and pain on depressed mood. Social support did not moderate the association. Conclusions: Self-efficacy for managing pain is important in the development of depressed mood. According to the results of this study, we suggest that the detection of low social support and low self-efficacy might be important in long-term rehabilitation process. Implications for Rehabilitation Risk for depressed mood one year after an accident is high: One in five workers report depressed mood. Protective factors for depressed mood in injured workers needs to be considered in the rehabilitation. Focusing on resources like social support and self-efficacy could be protective against depressed mood. The early detection of low social support and low self-efficacy might be important in long-term rehabilitation processes

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Pjanic, Irena; Messerli, Nadine; Bachmann, Monica; Siegenthaler, Franziska Anna; Hoffmann-Richter, Ulrike and Znoj, Hansjörg

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0963-8288

Publisher:

Informa Healthcare

Language:

English

Submitter:

Adriana Biaggi

Date Deposited:

25 Apr 2014 07:43

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2016 01:47

Publisher DOI:

10.3109/09638288.2013.837971

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.43641

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43641

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