Quantitative 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain: Influence of composition and parameterization of the basis set in linear combination model-fitting

Hofmann, Lucie; Slotboom, Johannes; Jung, Bruno; Maloca, Peter; Boesch, Christoph Hans; Kreis, Roland (2002). Quantitative 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain: Influence of composition and parameterization of the basis set in linear combination model-fitting. Magnetic resonance in medicine, 48(3), pp. 440-453. Wiley-Liss 10.1002/mrm.10246

[img] Text
10246_ftp.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (218kB) | Request a copy

Localized short-echo-time (1)H-MR spectra of human brain contain contributions of many low-molecular-weight metabolites and baseline contributions of macromolecules. Two approaches to model such spectra are compared and the data acquisition sequence, optimized for reproducibility, is presented. Modeling relies on prior knowledge constraints and linear combination of metabolite spectra. Investigated was what can be gained by basis parameterization, i.e., description of basis spectra as sums of parametric lineshapes. Effects of basis composition and addition of experimentally measured macromolecular baselines were investigated also. Both fitting methods yielded quantitatively similar values, model deviations, error estimates, and reproducibility in the evaluation of 64 spectra of human gray and white matter from 40 subjects. Major advantages of parameterized basis functions are the possibilities to evaluate fitting parameters separately, to treat subgroup spectra as independent moieties, and to incorporate deviations from straightforward metabolite models. It was found that most of the 22 basis metabolites used may provide meaningful data when comparing patient cohorts. In individual spectra, sums of closely related metabolites are often more meaningful. Inclusion of a macromolecular basis component leads to relatively small, but significantly different tissue content for most metabolites. It provides a means to quantitate baseline contributions that may contain crucial clinical information.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology > DCR Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology (AMSM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Nephrology and Hypertension

UniBE Contributor:

Hofmann, Lucie; Slotboom, Johannes; Boesch, Christoph Hans and Kreis, Roland

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0740-3194

Publisher:

Wiley-Liss

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christoph Hans Boesch

Date Deposited:

18 Mar 2014 15:27

Last Modified:

28 Dec 2014 10:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/mrm.10246

PubMed ID:

12210908

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.43981

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/43981

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback