Influence of Gestational Age and Parental Education on Executive Functions of Children Born Very Preterm

Ritter, Barbara Catherine; Nelle, Mathias; Steinlin, Maja; Everts, Regula (2013). Influence of Gestational Age and Parental Education on Executive Functions of Children Born Very Preterm. Journal of Neonatal Biology, 2(2), p. 120. OMICS Group 10.4172/2167-0897.1000120

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Background: Children born very preterm (<32 weeks’ gestational age; VPT) and/or very low birth weight (<1500 g; VLBW) are at high risk of deficits in executive functions, namely inhibition, working memory, and shifting. Both, gestational age and socioeconomic factors, such as parental education, are known to influence executive functions, with children born at lower gestational age and with lower educated parents displaying worse executive skills. This study aimed to investigate if maternal and paternal education moderated the relationship between gestational age and executive functions in VPT/VLBW children aged 8-12 years. It was hypothesised that the disadvantageous effect of low gestational age could be buffered more easily in families with higher educational background. Methods: Sixty VPT/VLBW children born in the cohort of 1998-2003 were recruited. All children completed executive function tasks (inhibition, working memory, and shifting). Results: There was a significant dose-response-relationship between gestational age and inhibition, with children being born at earlier gestational age showing worse inhibition. However, neither maternal nor paternal education moderated the relationship between gestational age and executive functions significantly. Conclusion: children than parental education. The disadvantageous effect of low gestational age was equal in children with higher and lower educated parents. However, the impact of gestational age and parental education on executive functions may differ depending on the socioeconomic spectrum of the study sample.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
10 Strategic Research Centers > Center for Cognition, Learning and Memory (CCLM)

UniBE Contributor:

Ritter, Barbara; Nelle, Mathias; Steinlin, Maja and Everts, Regula

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2167-0897

Publisher:

OMICS Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Mathias Nelle

Date Deposited:

15 May 2014 11:31

Last Modified:

11 Dec 2014 10:17

Publisher DOI:

10.4172/2167-0897.1000120

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.44090

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/44090

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