Atlantoaxial epidural abscess secondary to grass awn migration in a dog.

Linon, Elisa; Geissbühler, Urs; Karli, Philemon; Forterre, Franck (2014). Atlantoaxial epidural abscess secondary to grass awn migration in a dog. Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology, 27(2), pp. 155-158. Schattauer 10.3415/VCOT-13-07-0095

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A two-year-old female Lucerne Hound was presented with a one-week history of signs of progressive neck pain, inappetence, apathy, and an elevated rectal temperature. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were consistent with a foreign body abscess in the epidural space at the level of the first and second cervical vertebrae. A left-sided dorso-lateral atlantoaxial approach was performed, revealing an epidural abscess containing a grass awn. The clinical signs resolved within three days of surgery and the dog made a full recovery. This case report shows that grass awns can migrate to the atlantoaxial region in dogs and MRI findings lead to a suspicion of caudo-cranial migration within the spinal canal.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Neurology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Linon, Elisa; Geissbühler, Urs; Karli, Philemon and Forterre, Franck

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0932-0814

Publisher:

Schattauer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Susanne Portner

Date Deposited:

22 Aug 2014 15:28

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 03:36

Publisher DOI:

10.3415/VCOT-13-07-0095

PubMed ID:

24493255

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Epidural abscess, MRI, atlantoaxial dog, foreign body

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.44231

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/44231

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