The recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to skin wounds is independent of wound size

Verstappen, Jochem; Katsaros, Christos; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Torensma, Ruurd; Von den Hoff, Johannes W (2011). The recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to skin wounds is independent of wound size. Wound repair and regeneration, 19(2), pp. 260-7. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00671.x

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Wounded skin recruits progenitor cells, which repair the tissue defect. These cells are derived from stem cells in several niches in the skin. In addition, bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are recruited and contribute to wound repair. We hypothesized that larger wounds recruit more cells from the bone marrow. Wild-type rats were lethally irradiated and transplanted with bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats. Seven weeks later, 4, 10, and 20 mm wounds were created. The wound tissue was harvested after 14 days. The density of GFP-positive cells in the wounds and the adjacent tissues was determined, as well as in normal skin from the flank. Bone marrow-derived myofibroblasts, activated fibroblasts, and macrophages were also quantified. After correction for cell density, the recruitment of BMDCs (23±11%) was found to be independent of wound size. Similar fractions of GFP-positive cells were also detected in nonwounded adjacent tissue (29±11%), and in normal skin (26±19%). The data indicate that BMDCs are not preferentially recruited to skin wounds. Furthermore, wound size does not seem to affect the recruitment of BMDCs.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Orthodontics

UniBE Contributor:

Katsaros, Christos

ISSN:

1067-1927

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:16

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00671.x

PubMed ID:

21362094

Web of Science ID:

000287878100236

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/4456 (FactScience: 208670)

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