Antimicrobial effects of murine mesenchymal stromal cells directed against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum: role of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs).

Spekker, K.; Leineweber, M.; Degrandi, D.; Ince, V.; Brunder, S.; Schmidt, S. K.; Stuhlsatz, S.; Howard, J. C.; Schares, G.; Degistirici, O.; Meisel, R.; Sorg, R. V.; Seissler, J.; Hemphill, Andrew; Pfeffer, K.; Däubener, W. (2013). Antimicrobial effects of murine mesenchymal stromal cells directed against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum: role of immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). Medical microbiology and immunology, 202(3), pp. 197-206. Springer 10.1007/s00430-012-0281-y

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Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have a multilineage differentiation potential and provide immunosuppressive and antimicrobial functions. Murine as well as human MSCs restrict the proliferation of T cells. However, species-specific differences in the underlying molecular mechanisms have been described. Here, we analyzed the antiparasitic effector mechanisms active in murine MSCs. Murine MSCs, in contrast to human MSCs, could not restrict the growth of a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii (BK) after stimulation with IFN-γ. However, the growth of a type II strain of T. gondii (ME49) was strongly inhibited by IFN-γ-activated murine MSCs. Immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) as well as guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) contributed to this antiparasitic effect. Further analysis showed that IFN-γ-activated mMSCs also inhibit the growth of Neospora caninum, a parasite belonging to the apicomplexan group as well. Detailed studies with murine IFN-γ-activated MSC indicated an involvement in IRGs like Irga6, Irgb6 and Irgd in the inhibition of N. caninum. Additional data showed that, furthermore, GBPs like mGBP1 and mGBP2 could have played a role in the anti-N. caninum effect of murine MSCs. These data underline that MSCs, in addition to their regenerative and immunosuppressive activity, function as antiparasitic effector cells as well. However, IRGs are not present in the human genome, indicating a species-specific difference in anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum effect between human and murine MSCs.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Hemphill, Andrew

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0300-8584

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Susanne Portner

Date Deposited:

06 Aug 2014 16:55

Last Modified:

14 Oct 2015 11:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00430-012-0281-y

PubMed ID:

23269418

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.44749

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/44749

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