Building silent compartments at the nuclear periphery: a recurrent theme.

Meister, Pierre; Taddei, Angela (2013). Building silent compartments at the nuclear periphery: a recurrent theme. Current opinion in genetics & development, 23(2), pp. 96-103. Elsevier 10.1016/j.gde.2012.12.001

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In eukaryotes, the genetic material is stored in the nucleus, which is enclosed in a double lipid bilayer, the nuclear envelope (NE). It protects the genome from physical stress and separates it from the rest of the cell. On top of this physical function, growing evidence shows that the nuclear periphery contributes to the 3D organization of the genome. In turn, tridimensional organization of chromatin in the nuclear space influences genome expression. Here we review recent findings on the function of this physical barrier in gene repression and latest models on how silent subnuclear compartments at the NE are built in yeast as well as in the nematode C. elegans and mammalian cells; trying to draw parallels between the three systems.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Cell Biology

UniBE Contributor:

Meister, Pierre

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0959-437X

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pierre Meister

Date Deposited:

27 Apr 2014 15:56

Last Modified:

24 Feb 2015 01:19

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.gde.2012.12.001

PubMed ID:

23312840

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.45438

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/45438

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