Myelography in the Age of MRI: Why We Do It, and How We Do It

Ozdoba, Christoph; Gralla, Jan; Rieke, Alexander; Binggeli, Ralph; Schroth, Gerhard (2011). Myelography in the Age of MRI: Why We Do It, and How We Do It. Radiology research and practice, 2011, p. 329017. New York, N.Y.: Hindawi 10.1155/2011/329017

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Myelography is a nearly ninety-year-old method that has undergone a steady development from the introduction of water-soluble contrast agents to CT myelography. Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging into clinical routine in the mid-1980s, the role of myelography seemed to be constantly less important in spinal diagnostics, but it remains a method that is probably even superior to MRI for special clinical issues. This paper briefly summarizes the historical development of myelography, describes the technique, and discusses current indications like the detection of CSF leaks or cervical root avulsion.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurosurgery

UniBE Contributor:

Ozdoba, Christoph; Gralla, Jan; Rieke, Alexander; Binggeli, Ralph Silvio and Schroth, Gerhard

ISSN:

2090-1941

Publisher:

Hindawi

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:16

Last Modified:

24 Dec 2014 06:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1155/2011/329017

PubMed ID:

22091378

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.4549

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/4549 (FactScience: 208925)

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