Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency Caused by a Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) Gene in the Mother Highlighting the Importance of Zn (2+) for Normal Growth and Development

Miletta, Maria Consolata; Bieri, Andreas; Kernland Lang, Kristin Helene; Schöni, Martin Heinrich; Petkovic, Vibor; Flück, Christa; Eblé, Andrée; Mullis, Primus-Eugen (2013). Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency Caused by a Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) Gene in the Mother Highlighting the Importance of Zn (2+) for Normal Growth and Development. International journal of endocrinology, 2013, p. 259189. Hindawi 10.1155/2013/259189

[img]
Preview
Text
kernland_int j endocrinol.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (2MB) | Preview

Suboptimal dietary zinc (Zn(2+)) intake is increasingly appreciated as an important public health issue. Zn(2+) is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to Zn(2+) deficiency, as they require large amounts of Zn(2+) for their normal growth and development. Although term infants are born with an important hepatic Zn(2+) storage, adequate Zn(2+) nutrition of infants mostly depends on breast milk or formula feeding, which contains an adequate amount of Zn(2+) to meet the infants' requirements. An exclusively breast-fed 6 months old infant suffering from Zn(2+) deficiency caused by an autosomal dominant negative G87R mutation in the Slc30a2 gene (encoding for the zinc transporter 2 (ZnT-2)) in the mother is reported. More than 20 zinc transporters characterized up to date, classified into two families (Slc30a/ZnT and Slc39a/Zip), reflect the complexity and importance of maintaining cellular Zn(2+) homeostasis and dynamics. The role of ZnTs is to reduce intracellular Zn(2+) by transporting it from the cytoplasm into various intracellular organelles and by moving Zn(2+) into extracellular space. Zips increase intracellular Zn(2+) by transporting it in the opposite direction. Thus the coordinated action of both is essential for the maintenance of Zn(2+) homeostasis in the cytoplasm, and accumulating evidence suggests that this is also true for the secretory pathway of growth hormone.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Dermatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Endokrinologie / Diabetologie / Metabolik (Pädiatrie)

UniBE Contributor:

Miletta, Maria Consolata; Bieri, Andreas; Kernland Lang, Kristin Helene; Schöni, Martin Heinrich; Petkovic, Vibor; Flück, Christa; Eblé, Andrée and Mullis, Primus-Eugen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1687-8337

Publisher:

Hindawi

Language:

English

Submitter:

Monika Schenk

Date Deposited:

12 Jun 2014 09:41

Last Modified:

12 Sep 2017 06:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1155/2013/259189

PubMed ID:

24194756

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.45534

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/45534

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback