Insulin increases serum leptin concentrations in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type I diabetes mellitus with and without ketoacidosis.

Flück, Christa; Kuhlmann, B V; Mullis, Primus-Eugen (1999). Insulin increases serum leptin concentrations in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type I diabetes mellitus with and without ketoacidosis. Diabetologia, 42(9), pp. 1067-1070. Springer 10.1007/s001250051272

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AIMS/HYPOTHESIS The aims of this study were to analyse the changes of serum leptin in newly diagnosed children and adolescents with Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus after insulin treatment and to examine the possible impact of ketoacidosis on these changes. METHODS Baseline serum leptin concentrations were measured in 28 newly diagnosed Type I diabetic patients [age 8.75 +/- 4.05 years (means +/- SD); BMI 15.79 +/- 2.47 kg/m(2); HbA(1 c) 11.3 +/- 1.9 %] with (n = 18) and without (n = 10) ketoacidosis before commencement of insulin treatment, at the time of diagnosis. Thereafter, during a 4-day course of continuous intravenous insulin injection to gain and maintain euglycaemia, serum leptin concentrations were assessed. RESULTS Baseline serum leptin concentrations, adjusted to age, BMI, sex and pubertal stage, differed among these patients. There was, however, an increase of leptin in all subjects from 1.37 +/- 0.56 ng/ml (mean +/- SD) up to 2.97 +/- 1.52 ng/ml by 117 % (p < 0.0001) after insulin therapy. On average, peak serum leptin concentration was obtained after 42 h of insulin treatment. Further, there was no difference in the mean increase of serum leptin concentrations in the two groups, namely with and without ketoadicosis, of insulin-dependent diabetic children and adolescents. In addition, there was no correlation between serum leptin concentrations and correction of ketoacidosis during insulin treatment. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION Insulin increases serum leptin, within 1 day, in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed Type I diabetes. Ketoacidosis does not influence this interaction between insulin and leptin.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Faculty Institutions > Teaching Staff, Faculty of Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Endocrinology/Metabolic Disorders
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Endokrinologie / Diabetologie / Metabolik (Pädiatrie)

UniBE Contributor:

Flück, Christa and Mullis, Primus-Eugen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0012-186X

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christa Emma Flück Pandey

Date Deposited:

13 Aug 2014 12:23

Last Modified:

13 Aug 2014 12:23

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s001250051272

PubMed ID:

10447517

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/45701

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