Type D Personality, Self-Efficacy, and Medication Adherence Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome

Molloy, G. J.; Randall, G.; Wikman, A.; Perkins-Porras, L.; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Steptoe, A. (2012). Type D Personality, Self-Efficacy, and Medication Adherence Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome. Psychosomatic medicine, 74(1), pp. 100-106. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/PSY.0b013e31823a5b2f

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Objective: To assess the relationship among Type D personality, self-efficacy, and medication adherence in patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: The study design was prospective and observational. Type D personality, self-efficacy for illness management behaviors, and medication adherence were measured 3 weeks after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome in 165 patients (mean [standard deviation] age = 61.62 [10.61] years, 16% women). Self-reported medication adherence was measured 6 months later in 118 of these patients. Multiple linear regression and mediation analyses were used to address the study research questions. Results: Using the original categorical classification, 30% of patients with acute coronary syndrome were classified as having Type D personality. Categorically defined patients with Type D personality had significantly poorer medication adherence at 6 months (r = j0.29, p G .01). Negative affectivity (NA; r = j0.25, p = .01) and social inhibition (r = j0.19, p = .04), the components of Type D personality, were associated with medication adherence 6 months after discharge in bivariate analyses. There was no evidence for the interaction of NA and social inhibition, that is, Type D personality, in the prediction of medication adherence 6 months after discharge in multivariate analysis. The observed association between NA and medication adherence 6 months after discharge could be partly explained by indirect effects through self-efficacy in mediation analysis (coefficient = j0.012; 95% bias-corrected and accelerated confidence interval = j0.036 to j0.001). Conclusions: The present data suggest the primacy of NA over the Type D personality construct in predicting medication adherence. Lower levels of self-efficacy may be a mediator between higher levels of NA and poor adherence to medication in patients with coronary heart disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Messerli, Nadine

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0033-3174

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Adriana Biaggi

Date Deposited:

24 Apr 2014 17:37

Last Modified:

10 Aug 2015 13:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/PSY.0b013e31823a5b2f

PubMed ID:

22155940

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Type D, adherence, compliance, self-management, negative affectivity, social inhibition.

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.46077

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/46077

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