Distinct coping strategies differentially predict urge levels and lapses in a smoking cessation attempt

Brodbeck, Jeannette; Bachmann, Monica S.; Znoj, Hansjörg (2013). Distinct coping strategies differentially predict urge levels and lapses in a smoking cessation attempt. Addictive behaviors, 38(6), pp. 2224-2229. Elsevier 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.02.001

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This study analysed mechanisms through which stress-coping and temptation-coping strategies were associated with lapses. Furthermore, we explored whether distinct coping strategies differentially predicted reduced lapse risk, lower urge levels, or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses during the first week of an unassisted smoking cessation attempt. Participants were recruited via the internet and mass media in Switzerland. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) with mobile devices was used to assess urge levels and lapses. Online questionnaires were used to measure smoking behaviours and coping variables at baseline, as well as smoking behaviour at the three-month follow-up. The sample consisted of 243 individuals, aged 20 to 40, who reported 4199 observations. Findings of multilevel regression analyses show that coping was mainly associated with a reduced lapse risk and not with lower urge levels or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses. 'Calming down' and 'commitment to change' predicted a lower lapse risk and also a weaker relation between urge levels and lapses. 'Stimulus control' predicted a lower lapse risk and lower urge levels. Conversely, 'task-orientation' and 'risk assessment' were related to higher lapse risk and 'risk assessment' also to higher urge levels. Disengagement coping i.e. 'eating or shopping', 'distraction', and 'mobilising social support' did not affect lapse risk. Promising coping strategies during the initial stage of smoking cessation attempt are targeted directly at reducing the lapse risk and are characterised by engagement with the stressor or one's reactions towards the stressor and a focus on positive consequences instead of health risks.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Brodbeck, Jeannette; Bachmann, Monica and Znoj, Hansjörg

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0306-4603

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Adriana Biaggi

Date Deposited:

25 Apr 2014 07:36

Last Modified:

11 Sep 2017 13:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.02.001

PubMed ID:

23501139

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.46086

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/46086

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