Smoking behaviour, former quit attempts and intention to quit in urban adolescents and young adults: A five-year longitudinal study

Bachmann, Monica S.; Znoj, Hansjörg; Brodbeck, Jeannette (2012). Smoking behaviour, former quit attempts and intention to quit in urban adolescents and young adults: A five-year longitudinal study. Public health, 126(12), pp. 1044-1050. Elsevier 10.1016/j.puhe.2012.08.006

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OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking behaviour, former quit attempts and intention to quit among Swiss adolescents and young adults over five year's time. STUDY DESIGN: five-year longitudinal study (2003, 2005 and 2008) based on a random urban community sample (N = 1345 complete cases). METHODS: Data were collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews with adolescents (16-17) and young adults (18-24). Main outcome measures included self-reported smoking behaviour, former quit attempts, smoking cessation methods and current intentions to quit smoking. RESULTS: Adolescents were more often non-smokers and less often daily smokers when compared to young adults at baseline (χ(2)(4) = 28.68, P < .001). Their smoking behaviour increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (T = 1445.50, r = .20, P < .001) in contrast to the stable smoking behaviour in young adults (χ(2)(2) = .12, n.s.). In longitudinal analyses young adults were also more stable in their smoking status at the later measurement points. In comparison adolescents changed their smoking status more often being non-smokers at baseline and smokers later on. Independently of the age group, the majority of smokers already had previously attempted to quit (65%) or intended to give up smoking at some point (72%). However only 17% were motivated to make the quit attempt within the next 6 months. Self-quitting was the preferred method, and 25% of the self-quitters had been successful. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates that different developments in smoking behaviour exist in adolescents and young adults. Our study reveals that a majority of smokers are willing to quit but often fail. Furthermore, the data indicates that for adolescents the focus should lie on primary prevention.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Bachmann, Monica; Znoj, Hansjörg and Brodbeck, Jeannette

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0033-3506

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Adriana Biaggi

Date Deposited:

25 Apr 2014 07:47

Last Modified:

05 Mar 2018 10:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.puhe.2012.08.006

PubMed ID:

23141147

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.46088

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/46088

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