Hypernatremia in critically ill patients

Lindner, Gregor; Funk, Georg-Christian (2013). Hypernatremia in critically ill patients. Journal of critical care, 28(2), 216.e11-216.e20. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jcrc.2012.05.001

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Hypernatremia is common in intensive care units. It has detrimental effects on various physiologic functions and was shown to be an independent risk factor for increased mortality in critically ill patients. Mechanisms of hypernatremia include sodium gain and/or loss of free water and can be discriminated by clinical assessment and urine electrolyte analysis. Because many critically ill patients have impaired levels of consciousness, their water balance can no longer be regulated by thirst and water uptake but is managed by the physician. Therefore, the intensivists should be very careful to provide the adequate sodium and water balance for them. Hypernatremia is treated by the administration of free water and/or diuretics, which promote renal excretion of sodium. The rate of correction is critical and must be adjusted to the rapidity of the development of hypernatremia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Lindner, Gregor

ISSN:

0883-9441

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Patricia Rajaonina

Date Deposited:

01 Apr 2014 08:51

Last Modified:

01 Apr 2014 08:51

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.jcrc.2012.05.001

PubMed ID:

22762930

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/47341

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