MODELING REACTIVE GAS UPTAKE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION IN AGGREGATED SOILS

Rasmuson, A.; Gimmi, Thomas; Fluhler, H. (1990). MODELING REACTIVE GAS UPTAKE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION IN AGGREGATED SOILS. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 54(5), pp. 1206-1213. Soil Science Society of America SSSA 10.2136/sssaj1990.03615995005400050002x

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Gas diffusion research in soils covers, to a large extent, the transport behavior of practically insoluble gases. We extend the mathematical description of gas transport to include reactive gaseous components that hydrolyze in water such as SO2 and CO2. The path between the free atmosphere and the microporous niches is modeled by assuming penetration through gas-filled macropores, air-water phase transfer, and diffusion and speciation in the liquid phase. For hydrolyzable gases, the rate of mass transfer into and the total absorption capacity of the soil solution may be high. Both the capacity and the transfer rate are influenced by the soil-solution pH; for high pH, they become extremely high for SO2. The soil absorption of such gases is also influenced by soil structure. Well-aerated, near-neutral soils are a potentially important sink for SO2.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geological Sciences

UniBE Contributor:

Gimmi, Thomas

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology

ISSN:

0361-5995

Publisher:

Soil Science Society of America SSSA

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thomas Gimmi

Date Deposited:

11 Sep 2014 10:24

Last Modified:

14 Sep 2015 11:30

Publisher DOI:

10.2136/sssaj1990.03615995005400050002x

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/47680

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