Static and dynamic characteristics of cerebral blood flow during the resting state in schizophrenia

Kindler, Jochen; Jann, Kay; Homan, Philipp; Hauf, Martinus; Walther, Sebastian; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela (2015). Static and dynamic characteristics of cerebral blood flow during the resting state in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia bulletin, 41(1), pp. 163-170. Oxford University Press 10.1093/schbul/sbt180

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Background: The cerebral network that is active during rest and is deactivated during goal-oriented activity is called the default mode network (DMN). It appears to be involved in self-referential mental activity. Atypical functional connectivity in the DMN has been observed in schizophrenia. One hypothesis suggests that pathologically increased DMN connectivity in schizophrenia is linked with a main symptom of psychosis, namely, misattribution of thoughts. Methods: A resting-state pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) study was conducted to measure absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 34 schizophrenia patients and 27 healthy controls. Using independent component analysis (ICA), the DMN was extracted from ASL data. Mean CBF and DMN connectivity were compared between groups using a 2-sample t test. Results: Schizophrenia patients showed decreased mean CBF in the frontal and temporal regions (P < .001). ICA demonstrated significantly increased DMN connectivity in the precuneus (x/y/z = -16/-64/38) in patients than in controls (P < .001). CBF was not elevated in the respective regions. DMN connectivity in the precuneus was significantly correlated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores (P < .01). Conclusions: In schizophrenia patients, the posterior hub-which is considered the strongest part of the DMN-showed increased DMN connectivity. We hypothesize that this increase hinders the deactivation of the DMN and, thus, the translation of cognitive processes from an internal to an external focus. This might explain symptoms related to defective self-monitoring, such as auditory verbal hallucinations or ego disturbances.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > UPD Murtenstrasse

UniBE Contributor:

Kindler, Jochen; Jann, Kay; Homan, Philipp; Hauf, Martinus; Walther, Sebastian; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas and Hubl, Daniela

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0586-7614

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Martin Zbinden

Date Deposited:

25 Jun 2014 16:18

Last Modified:

28 Apr 2018 02:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/schbul/sbt180

PubMed ID:

24327756

Uncontrolled Keywords:

arterial spin labeling, default mode network, functional connectivity, precuneus, psychosis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.48075

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/48075

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