Jazz drummers recruit language-specific areas for the processing of rhythmic structure

Herdener, Marcus; Humbel, Thierry; Esposito, Fabrizio; Habermeyer, Benedikt; Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja; Seifritz, Erich (2014). Jazz drummers recruit language-specific areas for the processing of rhythmic structure. Cerebral cortex, 24(3), pp. 836-843. Oxford University Press 10.1093/cercor/bhs367

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Rhythm is a central characteristic of music and speech, the most important domains of human communication using acoustic signals. Here, we investigated how rhythmical patterns in music are processed in the human brain, and, in addition, evaluated the impact of musical training on rhythm processing. Using fMRI, we found that deviations from a rule-based regular rhythmic structure activated the left planum temporale together with Broca's area and its right-hemispheric homolog across subjects, that is, a network also crucially involved in the processing of harmonic structure in music and the syntactic analysis of language. Comparing the BOLD responses to rhythmic variations between professional jazz drummers and musical laypersons, we found that only highly trained rhythmic experts show additional activity in left-hemispheric supramarginal gyrus, a higher-order region involved in processing of linguistic syntax. This suggests an additional functional recruitment of brain areas usually dedicated to complex linguistic syntax processing for the analysis of rhythmical patterns only in professional jazz drummers, who are especially trained to use rhythmical cues for communication.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Management

UniBE Contributor:

Humbel, Thierry and Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1047-3211

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Daniela Zurkinden

Date Deposited:

06 Oct 2014 14:28

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 09:19

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/cercor/bhs367

PubMed ID:

23183709

Uncontrolled Keywords:

auditory processing, fMRI, Music, neuroplasticity, training

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.48371

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/48371

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