Adsorption of Components of the Plasma Kinin-forming System on the Surface of Porphyromonas gingivalis Involves Gingipains as the Major Docking Platforms

Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Bras, Grazyna; Chruscicka, Barbara; Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Sroka, Aneta; Herwald, Heiko; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Kozik, Andrzej (2011). Adsorption of Components of the Plasma Kinin-forming System on the Surface of Porphyromonas gingivalis Involves Gingipains as the Major Docking Platforms. Infection and immunity, 79(2), pp. 797-805. New York, N.Y.: American Society for Microbiology 10.1128/IAI.00966-10

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Enhanced production of proinflammatory bradykinin-related peptides, the kinins, has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease of human gingival tissues. In this report, we describe a plausible mechanism of activation of the kinin-generating system, also known as the contact system or kininogen-kallikrein-kinin system, by the adsorption of its plasma-derived components such as high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK), prekallikrein (PK), and Hageman factor (FXII) to the cell surface of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. The adsorption characteristics of mutant strains deficient in selected proteins of the cell envelope suggested that the surface-associated cysteine proteinases, gingipains, bearing hemagglutinin/adhesin domains (RgpA and Kgp) serve as the major platforms for HK and FXII adhesion. These interactions were confirmed by direct binding tests using microplate-immobilized gingipains and biotinylated contact factors. Other bacterial cell surface components such as fimbriae and lipopolysaccharide were also found to contribute to the binding of contact factors, particularly PK. Analysis of kinin release in plasma upon contact with P. gingivalis showed that the bacterial surface-dependent mechanism is complementary to the previously described kinin generation system dependent on HK and PK proteolytic activation by the gingipains. We also found that several P. gingivalis clinical isolates differed in the relative significance of these two mechanisms of kinin production. Taken together, these data show the importance of this specific type of bacterial surface-host homeostatic system interaction in periodontal infections.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology

UniBE Contributor:

Eick, Sigrun

ISSN:

0019-9567

Publisher:

American Society for Microbiology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:08

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1128/IAI.00966-10

PubMed ID:

21098107

Web of Science ID:

000286462000025

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/485 (FactScience: 199492)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback