Perceived malleability of self versus the world and its impact on youths’ control orientation and well-being in the US, Germany, and India

Mayer, Boris; Wang, Y. Z.; Sinha, S. (July 2011). Perceived malleability of self versus the world and its impact on youths’ control orientation and well-being in the US, Germany, and India (Unpublished). In: Regional Conference of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP). Istanbul. 30.06.-03.07.2011.

Primary control is defined as changing the world to fit the self, while secondary control is defined as changing the self to fit the world. To understand why different individuals prefer different kinds of control processes, we proposed a research project looking at US, German and Indian young adults. We hypothesize that theories of self and the world (fixed vs. malleable; Dweck, 1999) affect the prevailing mode of control used. Furthermore, adolescents’ cultural background is assumed to affect their self-world theories as well as the adaptiveness of specific modes of control. For example, in the US, where the self is tended to be seen as fixed and the world as malleable, primary control prevails and is more adaptive than secondary control while the reverse is expected for India. We present the theoretical outline and methodology of the study as well as first results.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology

UniBE Contributor:

Mayer, Boris

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Boris Mayer

Date Deposited:

02 Jul 2014 16:59

Last Modified:

26 Feb 2015 09:30

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/48820

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